Door – a useful one!

Door
A very special door, for sure! My son opened this washing machine door at a laundromat near his music school. A first for me! But not for my son. (Proud Dad showing his big smile).

Almost three weeks had gone by without seeing my son in and out of the house.  This felt odd and we, his parents, missed him.  He, in the meantime, was getting comfortable in his six-week program at a music school four hours away from home.  We decided to go see him.  Yay!!

When I saw his room…shared with four other boys…all in their mid teens, I took a deep breath, and said to myself, “It looks really good in here.”  Nothing was quite in its right place, but in that mess, everything was in its right place for these boys.

My son, in the meantime, had learned to take care of himself.  Since we were there, he asked us if we could drive him to the nearby laundromat that the students had been using.  He had his quarters and his detergent.  My son seemed taller, older and so very mature.  I felt like I missed years in his life!  My eyes teared up.

After a quick tour of this place, we headed down to take care of his laundry.   We would eat lunch once the clothes were in the washer.  Then come back and put clothes in the dryer.  And, then go have some ice cream before picking up dried clothes.  At the washing machine, I was about to open his laundry bag and I heard, “I got this, Mama,”  next thing – I’m watching this big boy put his clothes in the washer.  Another teary eye moment.  I was so impressed by my son; hence the picture.  This was the first time I saw him dealing with his dirty laundry!

I am very proud of my son!  A very proud mother, indeed!

To Norm 2.0 Thursday Doors … here’s mine:)

…thank you for visiting my blog…until next time 🙂

 

Companionable to Honorific

“I’m so happy you are here,” I say to my Dad, gently kissing him on his cheek.  “I am too.  I am, too,” he replies reaching for his grand-kids.  My daughter hugs him tightly. She is 2 1/2-years-old; and my son, 9-months-old.  This is a penultimate to ‎ Honorific article which I wrote in July 2014.  He made many trips to see us, but this was a trip my dad made 16 years ago.  My kids are now, teenagers.

My daughter is standing up on an adjacent chair where my dad is sitting; her tiny body resting on my dad’s right shoulder. My dad is eating his breakfast.  She’s watching him intently; now poking his cheeks, touching his head; then pulling his scarce hair; and finally, wanting to play with his food.  She is trying to take his toast out of his hands.  He let’s her take it. She dunks it in his tea!  I react,  “No, No, No!”  My dad quickly comes to her defense, “Let her.”  I step aside.  I help my son eat his breakfast.

In focus, is my peripheral vision: The toast, all of it now, is drowned in his tea-cup.  She is attempting to scoop it out with a spoon, only to splatter the content all over the table.  I remain quiet.  She puts the spoon down, but does not give up!  She puts her fingers in the cup, and takes a bit of soggy toast out in her pincer grasp.  A success!  She feeds that to my dad.  YUCK!  He, lovingly, eats it.  Patience and love, that was my dad.  Once she was done, my dad gladly cleaned the mess.

Another beautiful sunny, warm, and breezy day.  I look out the dining room window into our backyard and see my dad watching my daughter play in her sand pit.  I’m so happy he is here!  I notice him adjusting his thick eye-glasses, a few times.  The breeze must be bothering his eyes.

It’s already evening, I’m making my way to the kitchen to fix dinner.  I see my dad standing still in the hallway.  I ask, “Is everything okay, dad?”  He calmly says, “my vision seems blurry.”  I’m nervous now; he then says his vision is good.  I go on to make dinner.  During dinner, we talk about the house-painters, who were coming to paint our house.

The house gets painted in two days.  My dad seems happy with the paint job, “looks bright and beautiful,” he says.  It’s also time for my dad to return home, in upstate NY.  I live in the south.  “Get your eyes checked, ASAP,” I remind him as we drive to the airport.  He leaves.  Tears roll down my eyes.

Life, after his visit, went on as usual for a few months.  My dad’s eye-check-up went well.  However, at his next eye-check-up, six months later, the doctor said he had to have an eye surgery.  The ophthalmologist operated on both his eyes to save his vision.  But, his vision did not return.

Life, for him, was in a dark place.  He managed traveling with help, and came to “see” his grand kids.  He kept his spirits up.  He laughed and told us jokes while we sat together at the dinner table.  I would let him know placement of food on his dinner plate – 12 o’clock was broccoli, 3 o’clock was bread, 6 o’clock chicken, and 9 o’clock potatoes, and so on.

Nine years had passed…  “I’m a busy man, you know.  My time flies, too.  I THINK – all day long!” My dad would say to us, smiling, when he felt that we were feeling bad for him.  My kids had grown older and taller;  my dad, older and weaker.  He continued living his life in peace, grace, and gratitude; and in deep darkness.  A positive man in his core; my dad lived with great strength. 

In response to The Daily Post’s writing prompt: “Companionable.”

…thanks for visiting my blog…until next time:)

A good day, today!

No reactions, no hot headed-ness, no judgments, no arguments, no attitudes.  Kept my cool and did not react instantly.  Was a busy day, but ended up having a good day, today!

8 AM: My husband dropped my daughter to school.  Gave me extra time to enjoy my breakfast.

8:30 – 10:30 AM: Workout time!

11:30 AM: Checked out my daughter from school for physical therapy for an elbow injury.

12 PM: My daughter had lunch at a local restaurant.  I filled out paperwork for therapy session.

1:00 PM: Therapy time!  The therapist asked my daughter her expectations from the session.  I quickly answered, “Good news. She wants to hear that she can go to gymnastics again.”

2:00 PM: Therapist said, “She’s all good to go to gymnastics, but she still needs to be back for two more sessions.  That’s to make sure everything is going good as she eases into it.”

2:40 PM: My daughter goes back to school.

2:45 PM: I had my lunch – late!  Salad with chicken, strawberries, dried cranberries.  Yummy.

4 PM: My daughter returned home from school, played with the dogs, then got ready for gymnastics.  Totally excited since she had missed several weeks of it.

4:15 PM: I called a photo studio to register my daughter for her senior picture session.  After holding for 15 minutes I got a representative.  But our connection cracking!  Heck, I was not going to call again and wait again.  Finally got good connection, I had to be outside my house.  I felt a big relieve!

5 PM: I called the gymnastic place to make a payment.  The director said that she will not charge me until she sees how my daughter does today.  I was impressed…great customer service!

5:30 PM: Took my beagle for a walk.  My husband took our pit bull.  Great walk!

6:30 PM: Dinner time!  I skewered marinated chicken.  Then grilled it with peppers, onions.  Baked a potato and split it in half.  My husband sautéed peas.  He loves peas.

7 PM:  Had dinner out on the deck.  Gave dogs chewy treats.  Lit a candle.  Enjoyed a beautiful cool evening.

8 PM: My daughter returned from gymnastics.  All went well…she can continue.  Good news!  She had dinner…Edamame Pasta and Fruit smoothie.

9 PM:  Daughter started on her homework.  Dogs decided to rest.  Husband went to play tennis.  I sat to blog.  Son rehearsing saxophone with a group of friends, should be coming home soon – 15 hours at school!  Yikes.

Day is over.  Evening has gracefully given into quiet sleepy night.

I really wanted to blog about this day.  Everyday can be like this.  Advice: Need to keep my cool, and not react instantly in any situation!  Since I want good days like today, I’ll be reminding myself of this advice frequently.  Good days to you all too:)

….thank you for visiting my blog…until next time:)